Start Walker 2016 quaternary dating methods

Walker 2016 quaternary dating methods

The jaguar hunts wild animals weighing up to 300 kg (660 lb) in dense jungle, and its short and sturdy physique is thus an adaptation to its prey and environment.

The jaguar enjoys swimming and is largely a solitary, opportunistic, stalk-and-ambush predator at the top of the food chain.

As a keystone species it plays an important role in stabilizing ecosystems and regulating prey populations.

The head is robust and the jaw extremely powerful, it has the third highest bite force of all felids, after the tiger and lion.

A 100 kg (220 lb) jaguar can bite with a force of 503.6 kgf (1110 lbf) at canine teeth and 705.8 kgf (1556 lbf) at carnassial notch.

Results of DNA analysis shows the lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar, snow leopard, and clouded leopard share a common ancestor, and that this group is between six and ten million years old; the fossil record points to the emergence of Panthera just two to 3.8 million years ago.

The jaguar is thought to have diverged from a common ancestor of the Panthera species at least 1.5 million years ago and to have entered the American continent in the Early Pleistocene via Beringia, the land bridge that once spanned the Bering Strait.

In Mexican Spanish, its nickname is el tigre: 16th century Spaniards had no native word in their language for the jaguar, which is smaller than a lion, but bigger than a leopard, nor had ever encountered it in the Old World, and so named it after the tiger, since its ferocity would have been known to them through Roman writings and popular literature during the Renaissance.

Onca is the Portuguese onça, with the cedilla dropped for typographical reasons, found in English as ounce for the snow leopard, Panthera uncia.

The Greek pan- (πάν), meaning "all", and thēr (θήρ), meaning "prey" bears the meaning of "predator of all animals".

Use of the word for a beast originated in antiquity in the Orient, probably from India to Persia to Greece.

It derives from the Latin lyncea lynx, with the letter L confused with the definite article (Italian lonza, Old French l'once).