Start Radioactive dating u 238

Radioactive dating u 238

The New Zealand physicist Ernest Rutherford, suggested in 1905 that the exact age of a rock could be measured by means of radioactivity.

These scientists and many more after them discovered that atoms of uranium, radium and several other radioactive materials are unstable and disintegrate spontaneously and consistently forming atoms of different elements and emitting radiation, a form of energy in the process.

This half-life (t 1/2) is the name given to this value which Libby measured at 556830 years. After 10 half-lives, there is a very small amount of radioactive carbon present in a sample.

At about 50 000 to 60 000 years, the limit of the technique is reached (beyond this time, other radiometric techniques must be used for dating).

Here are some of the materials that can be successfully dated using this method: Potassium-Argon Dating Potassium-Argon (K-Ar) dating is the most widely applied technique of radiometric dating.