Start Relative dating of geological events

Relative dating of geological events

There is perhaps no beguilement more insidious and dangerous than an elaborate and elegant mathematical process built upon unfortified premises." - Chamberlain 1899b:224Following the discovery of radioactivity by Becquerel (1896), the possibility of using this phenomenon as a means for determining the age of uranium-bearing minerals was demonstrated by Rutherford (1906).

His result was in close agreement with his estimate of the age of the earth.

The solar estimate was based on the idea that the energy supply for the solar radioactive flux is gravitational contraction.

But in general, this rate is felt by the vast majority of mainstream scientists to be a fundamental constant. al., published a paper suggesting that the decay rate of radioactive elements is related to the Earth's distance from the Sun.

Of course, this was a close as Kelvin ever came to publicly recanting his position.

He believed this even though he did admit that some heat might be generated by the tidal forces or by chemical action.

However, on the whole, he thought that these sources were not adequate to account for anything more than a small faction of the heat lost by the Earth.

Based on these assumptions he at first suggested an age of the Earth of between 100 Ma and 500 Ma.