Start The whitest kids you know dating

The whitest kids you know dating

Eight, 10 people in suits, a circle of folding chairs, a chirpy HR rep with a clipboard.

After that he bounced around—selling suits at a Nordstrom outlet, cleaning carpets, waiting tables—until he learned that city bus drivers earn $22 an hour and get full benefits. In theory, Scott could apply for banking jobs again.

But his degree is almost eight years old and he has no relevant experience.

He sometimes considers getting a master’s, but that would mean walking away from his salary and benefits for two years and taking on another five digits of debt—just to snag an entry-level position, at the age of 30, that would pay less than he makes driving a bus.

At his current job, he’ll be able to move out in six months. There are millions of Scotts in the modern economy.

Every stereotype of our generation applies only to the tiniest, richest, whitest sliver of young people.

And the circumstances we live in are more dire than most people realize.

The other applicants described their corporate jobs and listed off graduate degrees. “One time the HR rep told us she did these three times a week,” Scott says.

“And I just knew I was never going to get a job.”After six months of applying and interviewing and never hearing back, Scott returned to his high school job at The Old Spaghetti Factory. He still lives at home, chipping in a few hundred bucks every month to help his mom pay the rent.

Add it all up and it’s no surprise that we’re the first generation in modern history to end up poorer than our parents..

“Some days I breathe and it feels like something is about to burst out of my chest,” says Jimmi Matsinger.

“I’m 25 and I’m still in the same place I was when I earned minimum wage.” Four days a week she works at a dental office, Fridays she nannies, weekends she babysits.